Eurovision Song Contest: The Story Of Fire Saga on Netflix, is a musical fest filled with colours, great music, fun, all coalesced to form an entertaining watch. But the story slightly derails in between which later grabs its grip by the climax.

 

 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

Eurovision Song Contest: The Story Of Fire Saga sets an instance to whatever your dream is, if you set your heart on it, if you fight for it with true passion and constant hard-work, despite facing a lot failures and criticism, you will definitely achieve it.

SYNOPSIS:

The aspiring musicians Lars and Sigrit have always dreamt of winning the world’s biggest music competition ‘The Eurovision Song Contest’ and finally, with lot of passion, persistence and series of lucky events, they get a chance to participate in it. How the competition puts their relationship into test, how it changes their vision towards music and their dream forms the plot of the story.

REVIEW:

This Netflix musical romance is a festival of music, lights and love. In the time of pandemic, people do need a light at heart romantic comedy which can teach how to dream, love and be passionate towards it. If you have a dream, ‘fight like a viking’ until you achieve it.

The most salient point this film highlights is the fact that it’s not winning or losing that decides if you are a winner or loser, but your perseverance and dedication towards what you do. If you do something from your heart, you already win. It also carries a layer of romance in the story, which in between does not fit well. The writers could have focused more towards the contest and debacles the protagonists face and could have set the heat of competition higher.

It also carries some fortuitous events and fictitious elements encompassed to the story that may seem silly to some audience, but in the end, it all just leads to a happy face.

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TECHNICAL SIDE:

Story and Script

Looking at the screenplay written by Will Ferrell and Andrew Steele, the 123 min musical romance has enough joy and hair raising moments twinned with some dolor moments and failures that take place in an artist’s life. It has some fictitious elements intended to spice up the narration which goes with the comic genre it carries throughout. Even though fun enough, it messes with its script at times. It’s like a wave which starts from the top, goes down and ascends again. It starts good, faces a sink and again ladders up to an exhilarating climax.

Direction

Directed by David Dobkin, it could have been bit more crisp and sharp. Pretty decent work, but loses the audience interest in between losing its pace. Keeping the flaws aside, Eurovision Song Contest: The Story Of Fire Saga is still definitely a fun ride with lots of laugh, love and entertainment.

Performance

The cast and their performance was truly a topping to the film. Will Ferrel and Rachel McAdams were perfect as Lars and Sigrit respectively. They ship a great pair. Dan Stevens as Alexander, Demi Lovato as Katiana, Pierce Brosnan as Erick also performed really well.

Visuals/Cinematography

Cinematography by Danny Cohen travels through the emotions and colours. It embodies the feelings and essence of the contest and the world it sets up to the viewers, taking them with it. Even though few frames lose the quality it keeps throughout, rest of the frames do shine and keep our eyes glued to the musical gala filled with an air of fun and lights. Visually it definitely does a great job.

Music and Background score

Music by Atli Orvarsson is mind blowing. It truly adds an emotion and depth to the film. Each song syncs perfectly to the scene and climax song is just too befitting. The entire film, which was facing some serious pitfalls in writing, gets back on track and holds the viewers attention and interest with the beautiful, soul stirring musical climax that uplifts the descending screenplay.

Conclusion

Wrapping up, Eurovision Song Contest: The Story Of Fire Saga is a delightful watch for kids, family and dreamers, putting aside the intellectual elements. Watch it for fun and those who want to witness some seriously serious stuff may want to skip this one.

 

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